Finding the future in the most unlikely of places

What to make of these recent news items?  I’m scratching my head.

  • In early June, Edward Snowden disclosed the massive NSA surveillance program that has been tracking you, me and everyone else.
  • On Tuesday, June 11, Turkish police arrested at least 47 lawyers at the Hall of Justice in Istanbul.  According to the Progressive Lawyers Association of Turkey, the lawyers were in the process of issuing a press release relating to the protests when their arrests began.

  • On Friday, June 14, the U.S. House of Representatives approved a $638 Billion defense budget which forbids President Obama from closing the Guantanamo Bay detention facility. About the same time, the Pentagon released a 15-page list of names — 166 men who are detained indefinitely at Guantanamo — no trial, no rights, no future.  Is Congress just consigning them to a deep, dark hole?
  • On Monday, June 17, Hamas announced it has deployed a 600-strong force to prevent rocket fire at Israel. 
  • And the Standing Man in Istanbul (Erdem Gunduz) stood silently for hours staring at a picture of Ataturk (Turkey’s founder) and inspired similar protests in other cities in Turkey and throughout the world — Milan, Stuttgart, Amsterdam, Times Square in NYC, and even Las Vegas, Nevada.
Standing in Amsterdam

Standing in Amsterdam

How do I connect these dots?

The path to a new world may not pass through the traditional halls of power.  They’ve become corrupted and I’m not sure they can be fixed.  The change we need and the future we hope for may be in the hands of some unlikely people — whistle blowers, lawyers taking personal and professional risks, people standing silently for hours, and even groups formally designated as terrorist organizations.

This feels like a momentous time.

 

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1 Comment

Filed under nonviolent resistance, Peaceful, Video

One response to “Finding the future in the most unlikely of places

  1. Pingback: Finding the future in the most unlikely of places. (Re-blogging) | The Victorian Ankle

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