Gaza Facts vs. Propaganda – Shame on the Washington Post

Mike Merryman-Lotze is the Middle East Program Director at the American Friends Service Committee.  When the Washington Post published an opinion piece (7/19/2018) about Gaza which begged for some facts and objectivity, Mike responded.  His response is reprinted below with permission. Mike headshot

The Washington Post has given Jason Greenblatt, Jared Kushner, and David Friedman room to write about Gaza. What they have written has to be one of the most dishonest and transparently propagandistic pieces I’ve read on Gaza.

I’ve therefore taken a few minutes to add my own quick comments into the text of the article:

WP Article: At the end of a productive six-day trip to the region recently, one reality was painfully clear: The nightmare of Hamas’s leadership is continuing and needlessly prolonging the suffering of the Palestinian people in Gaza.

WP Article: Despite the billions of dollars invested for the benefit of Palestinians in Gaza over the past 70 years, 53 percent of the people there live below the poverty level , and the unemployment rate is a crippling 49 percent. The Palestinians of Gaza are stuck in a vicious cycle where corrupt and hateful leadership has provoked conflicts leading to reduced opportunities and the poverty and hopelessness that follow.

Mike’s Comment: Most of the investment in Gaza is reconstruction money given to rebuild infrastructure and homes destroyed by Israeli bombings. The economy has been devastated by the blockade. If you want to deal with employment the issue is the blockage of imports, exports, and goods needs to produce economic output. There has been a conscious decades long policy of dedevelopment implemented by Israel in Gaza. The unemployment and poverty rates in Gaza are not linked to the Palestinian leadership but to Israeli policies. If you are concerned about this push for an end to the blockade.

WP Article: International donors are conflicted: Should they try to help the people directly, at the certain risk of enriching terrorists, or withhold funding to Hamas and watch the people it is supposed to govern suffer? In the past, investments in badly needed infrastructure have been diverted for weapons and other malign uses, and even the projects that are built are often destroyed as a consequence of Hamas’s aggression.

Mike’s Comment: The vetting procedures for foreign aid going into Gaza are more restrictive than in any other place in the world. There is no money going from foreign governments to Hamas. Foreign aid goes to help people. If you consider rebuilding electrical infrastructure and water systems assistance to Hamas and not repair of basic infrastructure that people need then there is something wrong. No money for basic infrastructure is diverted for weapons. While Hamas does spend a portion of its money on weapons, even Israeli government sources report that it spends 80% or more of its funds in Gaza on governance. Even if it moved the $100 million it spends on weapons towards infrastructure it could not meet needs, and it also could not get the supplies needed to repair infrastructure with that money because of the blockade and international sanctions. The issue again is not Hamas but the blockade and Israeli and international policies that deny Gaza access to the world.

WP Article: Until governance changes or Hamas recognizes the state of Israel, abides by previous diplomatic agreements and renounces violence, there is no good option.

Mike’s Comment: Hamas has repeatedly indicated that it is willing to consider a state in the areas occupied in 1967 and that it will talk with Israel. This has been the case for years. At the same time, the Likud Party platform formally rejects two states and nearly every other party in the ruling Israeli coalition formally rejects two states. Israeli actions also move to materially change the situation so that two states are not possible. The Nation State Law passed this week furthers the settlement enterprise and violates previous diplomatic agreements. Israeli has not rejected violence.

Further, if we really want to get technical it should be pointed out that according to the Israeli Defense Ministry, in 2015 a total of 21 rockets were fired from Gaza. In 2016 a total of 15 rockets were fired from Gaza. In 2017 a total of 35 rockets were fired from Gaza. Between January 1 and May 29 of 2018 only 10 rockets were fired from Gaza, with none fired during March, April, and the first weeks of May. At the same time, according to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, in 2015, 2016, and 2017, Israel killed 64 Palestinians in Gaza, injured over 2,700, and carried out attacks on Gaza nearly every day. Also, between January 1, 2018 and March 26, 2018 the Israeli military entered the Gaza buffer zone nine times to destroy property and clear land. During the same period, the Israeli military opened fire in the Gaza buffer zone 181 times, killing 2 people and injuring 13. These actions occurred before the start of the Great Return March. So where should we look if we are concerned about violence?

WP Article: Seventy years after the founding of Israel, it would be wise for Hamas to acknowledge that the existence of Israel is a permanent reality. Almost all in the Middle East have come to accept this fact, and many even embrace it. At the expense of the Palestinian people, Hamas is fighting a morally bankrupt, decades-old war that has long been lost.

Mike’s Comment: Equally, it might be important for the Israeli government to recognize the rights of Palestinians to a state. As noted above, no party in the ruling Israeli coalition supports two states. The Israeli government is taking action to make two states impossible, and the Israeli government just passed a law declaring that Palestinians have no right to self-determination.

WP Article: Peace will provide opportunity to break this stalemate, and peace will be achieved only by embracing reality and dismissing a flawed ideology. Life could significantly improve in short order for the Palestinian people if Hamas allowed it. There are engaged, interested parties with resources who are ready to get to work. Yet without real change accompanied by reliable security, progress is impossible. If Hamas demonstrates clear, peaceful intentions — not just by word but, more importantly, by deed — then all manner of new opportunities becomes possible.

Mike’s Comment: If you want change from Hamas engage with Hamas. Don’t write a mendacious article in the Post full of lies that the editors seem unable to fact check. Stop the blockade, end sanctions, allow Hamas to engage with the PA without that triggering new sanctions that would collapse the PA. All of this is meaningless if what is really demanded is one-sided capitulation and surrender.

WP Article: There is no reason the Palestinians (in both the West Bank and Gaza) can’t enjoy economic success and integrate into a thriving regional economy — if they let us help. As President Trump has said so many times, economic security is national security. By encouraging economic recovery in the region, we can enhance our efforts to increase stability as well.

Mike’s Comment: Economic prosperity under occupation is not possible, economic growth without rights and self-determination is meaningless. The issue isn’t economics, it is freedom.

WP Article: Hamas must immediately cease provoking or coordinating attacks on Israelis and Egyptians, and on infrastructure projects sponsored by donor nations and organizations. Rather than looking for opportunities to weaponize everything from kites to mirrors in order to attack Israel, Hamas should focus its ingenuity on improving the Gazan economy.

Mike’s Comment: What attacks on Egyptians and donor projects? These types of attacks simply haven’t occurred. Where are our fact checkers? What is the context of actions against Israel? Are those actions proactive or reactive? What is Israel’s role in all of this? Where do Israeli attacks on Gaza fit in and should they also stop? What about the blockade and the systematic denial of Palestinian rights? What about the continued loss of Palestinian life in Gaza? Is any of that a concern?

WP Article: Rather than cynically attempting to exploit its barbaric holding of Israeli soldiers and citizens, Hamas must return them to their families.

Mike’s Comment: Hamas holds a couple of Israeli soldiers captured while in Gaza and a few bodies of soldiers killed while fighting in Gaza. I agree with the idea that they should be returned home. However, also note that Israel holds literally thousands of Palestinian prisoners and hundreds (if not more) bodies of Palestinians it has killed. Israel has set up whole graveyards to hold the bodies of Palestinians that it refuses to return to families. The holding of bodies is a policy that Israel developed. All bodies should be returned.

WP Article: Instead of exploiting crossings such as Rafah and Salah al-Din to smuggle weapons and siphon off tax revenue for illicit purposes and personal enrichment, Hamas must hand those functions over in their entirety to the Palestinian Authority so that badly needed materials can get through to the people of Gaza. The international community stands ready to work with the Palestinian Authority on this vital effort.

Mike’s Comment: This is simply misinformation. Weapons have never been smuggled through formal crossings. While Hamas may have limited control of one side of the crossing, Egypt and Israel control the other sides of the crossings. This means that weapons must be smuggled through Israel and Egypt and it is those states that control what goes into Gaza. The PA does control crossings in Gaza and the US knows this. The PA is the force in Gaza that coordinates with Israel at crossings and Hamas has allowed that control. The issue is not changing who controls borders, it is the Israeli enforced blockade.

WP Article: The cycle is clear: Rockets, mortars, terror tunnels, kite bombs and other weapons of aggression lead only to stricter constraints on the people of Gaza. Hamas’s acts of aggression have only produced misery for the people of Gaza. The true victims of this terrible situation are the many Palestinians who are not rioting but whose futures are dimmed by Hamas’s radical approach.

Mike’s Comments: Again, according to the Israeli Defense Ministry, in 2015 a total of 21 rockets were fired from Gaza. In 2016 a total of 15 rockets were fired from Gaza. In 2017 a total of 35 rockets were fired from Gaza. Between January 1 and May 29 of 2018 only 10 rockets were fired from Gaza, with none fired during March, April, and the first weeks of May. Tunnels may exist but simply haven’t been used to attack Israel. Burning kites didn’t start flying until long into the Gaza Return March and after more than 50 Palestinians had been killed and thousands injured.

If, over a period of three and a half years you have, on average, two to three rockets fired towards Israel each month and they don’t cause significant damage and at the same time you have daily attacks by Israel on Gaza and the maintenance of a brutal blockade, it seems clear that the cycle is not starting with rocket fire.

WP Article: It is evident that the leaders in this region are tired of being on this hopeless treadmill and are hungry for real change. There is a clear divide between the bad actors looking to cause destruction, violence and human misery, and the responsible leaders trying to create a better and sustainable future for their citizens. The world is moving forward, but bad choices are causing Palestinians to fall further and further behind.

Mike’s Comment: So the link included here in the original article notes that the world is moving beyond two states. I’m perfectly OK with that, but let’s be clear that closure of the two state possibility is only due to Israel actions. Palestinians can be intransigent and can say no, but they can’t change the situation on the ground in any material way that changes what a possible solution will look like.

What has changed the situation? Settlements, and the authors should know this since Greenblatt served as a guard on a settlement and both Friedman and Kushner were major donors to settlements. Hey wait a minute, isn’t that relevant information that the editors should consider?

WP Article: The international community also bears some blame. More countries want to simply talk and condemn than are willing to confront reality, propose realistic solutions and write meaningful checks. The United States has invested more money in helping the Palestinian people than has any other country in the world.

Mike’s Comments: Damn right the international community bears much of the blame. Countries want to simply talk, condemn, not confront reality, and not propose realistic solutions? Really? Here is a mirror.

WP Article: For far too long, Gaza has lurched from crisis to crisis, sustained by emergency appeals and one-time caravans of aid, without dealing with the root cause: Hamas leadership is holding the Palestinians of Gaza captive. This problem must be recognized and resolved or we will witness yet another disastrous cycle.

Mike’s Comment: We can agree, Gaza has existed in crisis for far too long. And the authors are a major reason why that crisis continues. To give them a platform to put forward such garbage is indefensible. To simply let them write without any editorial oversight is wrong. The Post should be ashamed for publishing such transparent propaganda, although the post editorial page itself is pretty atrocious on this issue.

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Travel suggestions for Israel-Palestine

 

An American friend recently told me she’s traveling to Israel soon for a well-deserved vacation. It’s very, very easy to visit Israel and never, ever catch a glimpse of Palestine or the occupation.  I suspect the Israeli government likes it that way.  Out of sight, out of mind.

Loss of Land

I asked her if she’d be interested in suggestions for seeing the “other side” and when she enthusiastically agreed, I compiled the following list, with one strong caveat. “Don’t mention your intention to visit the Occupied Palestinian Territories or any of these groups when you’re stopped and questioned at Ben Gurion Airport, which you surely will be.”

  1. Some tips on visiting Israel and Palestine prepared by Green Olive Collective — check the pdf here.   And here are some interesting tours in English that the Collective recommends, such as the Banksy tour to Bethlehem, the Gaza Border tour, and the Galilee and Nazareth tour.
  2. Breaking the Silence is a group of Israeli soldiers who lead tours and speak out about their experience in the Army.
  3. International Jerusalem YMCA has been a place of coexistence between Jews, Christians and Muslims for a long time.
  4. The Oasis of Peace is an intentional community that started in the late 1970s or early 1980s where Israeli Jews and Palestinian Muslims and Christians live together. The community is located between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.
  5. Btselem is the information center for human rights in the Occupied Territories.  I don’t know if they provide tours, but they have a wealth of information.  If I could return to Israel, I would visit their office in Jerusalem.
  6. ICAHD (Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions) provides tours also. The founder of this group, Jeff Halper, is an American Jew who moved to Israel many years ago. He speaks around the world about the occupation.

I wish I could travel to Israel. On my last visit (March 2016) I was stopped at the border between Israel and Jordan, questioned for 5+ hours and finally admitted after an Israeli friend vouched for me on the phone.  In the past couple of years, Israel has passed laws preventing visitors (including Jews) from entering Israel if they support BDS (Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions). I’m on Israel’s list now as a BDS supporter.

A Jewish American who had a visa to travel to Israel was recently deported when she arrived at Ben Gurion Airport and her visa was revoked because of her BDS activism. And just this week, a prominent Jewish donor to Israel was stopped by airport security when he was leaving Israel and questioned when they found a pro-Palestinian pamphlet in his suitcase. Read about it here.  I advise you not to mention any of these groups when you are questioned by airport security.

I hope you have an eye-opening experience during your visit to Israel-Palestine. I’d love to talk with you about your visit when you return home.

 

 

 

 

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A Message to Palestine Solidarity Activists

The boundary can be murky between acts or words that are legitimately anti-Semitic and the common anti-Semitic trope that the Israeli-apologists all-too-often throw up. But it’s important that we (Palestine solidarity activists) know the difference. In that regard, I highly recommend On Anti-Semitism: Solidarity and the Struggle for Justice published by Jewish Voice for Peace in 2017. You can order it here.

On Anti-Semitism

A good case in point occurred today when a Facebook friend told me that “the Zionists control the media.” There’s no evidence to support that statement (the first clue that it may be anti-Semitic) and, in fact, there’s a well-documented history of lies about the Jews controlling the media, and hence controlling our minds. FAIR has an informative piece about how the lie spread and gained currency.

It is an old canard. Having been codified in the Protocols of the Elders of Zion (forged by Czarist cops in 1905), the lie was sold here by Henry Ford through the 1920s. (“The Twelfth Protocol,” proclaimed his Dearborn Independent, “contains the entire plan of Control of the Press, reaching from the present time into the future when the Jewish World Government shall be established.”)

I responded by telling him — “The Zionist control the media” is anti-Semitic pablum. Sorry.

Facebook is not a good medium to have serious conversations, and the topic of anti-Semitism certainly qualifies as serious. Our exchange ended very quickly.

Lora Lucero highly disagree with you and if you have an issue with it that is your issue not mine. And with the newest definition of anti-semetic, it is almost a badge of honor to be called anti-semetic. And I don’t ever remember trying to insult and do name calling when I have disagreed with you.

Joe ….. I’m not name-calling. If it’s a badge of honor, then please wear it with pride. However, as I’ve used the term “anti-Semitic” it should worry you. I recommend this book On Anti-Semitism.

Then I received his angry and hurt private message and the discussion ended.

My “dribble” doesn’t interest (—-) … who unfriended and blocked me. THAT’s how insular and closed-minded many of the Palestine solidarity activists are. With friends like that, Palestinians really don’t need enemies.

My warning to Palestine solidarity activists is simple: Don’t become entrenched in the binary thinking that can so easily trap people who see themselves as activists (advocates) for one side or another.  We know the trap.

Good guy versus bad guy.

Us versus them.

Righteous victim versus the evil perpetrator.

When we fall victim to such simple binary thinking, we’re more susceptible to falling victim to anti-Semitic pablum because it confirms our private prejudices.

I must keep repeating to myself: “Are there facts to support this statement?”  “Are there facts to support this statement?”  “Are there facts to support this statement?”

In the case of Zionists or Jews controlling the media, there are no facts to support that notion.

Furthermore, be careful who you get into bed with. Activists who truly believe that the Zionists and/or Jews control the media will find greater solace with the Far Right than with thoughtful progressives. Check this recent article in The Nation — The Mainstreaming of Anti-Semitism in the US (The attacks against George Soros are an attack on decency in American public life) by Eric Alterman.

 

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Blue Lake

A few years ago, a Palestinian man from Gaza visited me in New Mexico. In addition to the typical tourist sites, I wanted him to see the indigenous people in Taos Pueblo, thinking he might draw some connections, or simpatico as we say in New Mexico.

Quite by accident, we happened to visit Taos Pueblo on a Feast Day, and we witnessed the music, dancing and solemn ceremonies involved in the tradition of these people. My Palestinian friend didn’t say much, and I’m not sure if he felt any kinship or connection with Taos Pueblo. Maybe I had assumed too much.

I wish I had told him the story about Blue Lake.

Blue Lake

Taos Pueblo members believe that their tribe was created from the sacred waters of the Blue Lake, or Ba Whyea. From the 1600s, the Spanish and Mexican authorities recognized the Taos Pueblo land rights. And when the U.S. government took control of the Southwest, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848) also recognized the Pueblo’s sovereignty over their land and Blue Lake.

Then in 1906, by Executive Order President Theodore Roosevelt placed Blue Lake and the surrounding watershed into the hands of the Forest Service as part of the Carson National Forest.  For the next 64 years, Taos Pueblo leaders struggled to regain their sacred land and waters. They traveled to Washington, DC many times to try and convince Congress to return Blue Lake to them.

In testimony before Congress in 1969, Paul Bernal explained, “In all of its programs the Forest Service proclaims the supremacy of man over nature; we find this viewpoint contradictory to the realities of the natural world and to the nature of conservation. Our tradition and our religion require people to adapt their lives and activities to our natural surroundings so that men and nature mutually support the life common to both. The idea that man must subdue nature and bend its processes to his purposes is repugnant to our people.”

A good history of the Blue Lake controversy can be found here. Finally, in 1970, President Nixon approved a bill that returned full sovereignty of Blue Lake and its watershed to Taos Pueblo.

In speaking of the Bill’s significance, President Nixon stated, “This is a bill that represents justice, because in 1906 an injustice was done in which land involved in this bill, 48,000 acres, was taken from the Indians involved, the Taos Pueblo Indians. The Congress of the United States now returns that land to whom it belongs … I can’t think of anything more appropriate or any action that could make me more proud as President of the United States.”

The Palestinians have been struggling since 1948 to regain sovereignty over their lands, by negotiation, by violence, and most often by nonviolent Sumud, or steadfastness. There are certainly big differences between the struggle for Blue Lake and the occupation of Palestine, but I also see some similarities.

  • Both indigenous peoples have a spiritual connection to the lands that were taken from them.
  • Both cases involved Anglo settlers moving in and pushing out the indigenous people with an arrogance and sense of entitlement that makes me cringe.
  • Both Palestine and Taos have generations of younger people who learned the stories and lessons passed down from their elders about the injustices perpetrated years ago; and memories don’t die.

The Israeli occupation of Palestine will have to end before there is justice in the Middle East, but I have no doubt that the Palestinians will find their justice, as Taos Pueblo did in 1970.

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Bridges

bridge-footbridge-path-2257

A Muslim-American journalist has recently been the target of serious anger and hostility by some other Muslim-Americans who claim he was wrong to visit the West Bank and sit down with Jewish settlers to hear their side of the story, the Zionists’ perspective. They claim he was a stooge for the Zionists, manipulated into presenting the two sides (Israel and Palestine) as equal and equally justified. The term of art is a “false equivalency”.

Wajahat AliWahajat Ali’s article in June 2018 issue of The Atlantic is long, but well worth the time to read carefully before delving into the controversy. I read it two times and was starting on my third time around when my attention was redirected elsewhere. Maybe I’ll go back to it.

 

I found his story interesting, illuminating and nuanced. I’ve heard that some pro-Palestine activists on the other hand consider Ali’s article “problematic,” one-sided (the Zionists’ side), normalizing the occupation, and promoting false equivalencies. Read the article for yourself and be the judge.

(I first heard that term “false equivalency” from a Zionist family member in 2001, complaining about something I said about Palestinians. I came to realize that people who hear two very disparate perspectives/sides discussed in the same breath might be offended because they don’t believe the other perspective deserves to be included or they believe their side was unfairly treated in the discussion.)

The unintentional beauty of this current ‘controversy’ — Muslims attacking a Muslim for meeting and writing about Jewish settlers in the West Bank — is that it highlights the challenge of understanding the ‘other’ (whether the ‘other’ is a Jewish settler, a white nationalist, a refugee or a migrant).

If half the energy expended by many who are dissecting The Atlantic article was directed, instead, to building bridges with the ‘other’ (whoever that may be in your life) …. the energy might have made a real difference.

Some may object and say “[t]he problem is that one cannot build a bridge to those who have consistently demonstrated in actions that there are no bridges to even be considered. Zionists will not change their attitude in the same way as those who endeavor to support justice will not change their’s. They are not, however, equal. Justice does not equate with continued, unmitigated oppression. It is fantasy to believe that this can be done.”

  • My notion of bridge-building does not envision a bridge expanding the wide divide separating us so that I can drag the ‘other’ back to my side.
  • My notion of bridge-building does not require me to accept or believe the ‘other’ perspective, it only gives me a channel to learn more about the ‘other’.
  • My notion of bridge-building does not weaken my convictions and beliefs; in fact, it may strengthen them because I will have the opportunity to examine my beliefs in the context of the ‘other’.

In my first year of law school, I took a criminal procedures class with 100+ other students. One day, Professor Kreitzberg asked me to stand up and argue in favor of the death penalty. (She knew I strongly opposed the death penalty).  I was shocked but I did as I was asked and mumbled through some half-baked ideas in favor of the death penalty. Then she turned to another student and asked him to speak in opposition to the death penalty, knowing full well that he personally supported it. He also did as he was instructed.

The lesson that my classmate and I both learned (and maybe some of the other students picked up on it too) was (1) it’s really tough to get in the shoes of the ‘other’ and (2) we are stronger advocates when we understand and can express the position of the ‘other.’ The same may be true in the Palestine-Israel conflict. Since Wajahat Ali is a lawyer by training, this lesson has probably been drilled into him too. His article in The Atlantic helped me understand the perspective of the Jewish settlers in a way that I never could have on my own. I don’t have access to the settlers. I can’t sit in their kitchens to talk with them, as Ali did.

Some argue that Wajahat Ali’s article about the Jewish settlers speaks over (perhaps drowns out) the voices of the Palestinians and Palestinian-Americans who are the ‘legitimate’ voices that the West needs to hear. I simply don’t buy it. The whole notion of ‘legitimate’ voices (implying that others’ are illegitimate) is very problematic in itself.

In the marketplace of ideas, competing voices and ideas are valuable and should be valued. Certainly, the Western narrative of Israel-Palestine has been heavily skewed by Israel’s Hasbara for many years, and push-back is warranted to influence and educate public opinion in the U.S. and elsewhere. But let’s not fall for the mistaken belief that there’s a monolithic Palestinian narrative, or a monolithic Muslim narrative. There isn’t. Maybe this fact is creating some angst for those who would like to control the Muslim narrative.

Wajahat Ali’s article has done a great service in furthering the art of bridge-building. Sadly, many on his own side of the bridge may not appreciate that fact yet.

 

 

 

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The Goal versus the War

Trump’s policy of separating young children from their parents when they cross the border has galvanized Americans of all stripes to stand up and fight back. I’m just as appalled but I think we have an opportunity here to really wake up and smell the coffee, and I’m afraid most of us don’t see it.

Flouting the law, and lying about it, has been this Administration’s modus operandi since January 2017. Disdain for human rights, disregard for environmental protections, and disgust for the social safety net have all been blazingly transparent.

The actions at the US-Mexico border are not unexpected, and certainly not in isolation. When a protester’s sign in El Paso caught my attention – “All People in All Countries have Value” – I realized here’s a chance to connect the dots.

Palestinian children have value, Syrian children have value, Yemeni children have value, just as the children from Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras have value. American children sleeping on the streets hungry have value. We may not be able to improve the lives of every child, but we can certainly refrain from doing harm to these children around the world, including at our southern border.

Closed 2

Here’s our opportunity to expand our wellspring of empathy and activism consistent with our country’s highest values and ideals.

For years, Israeli forces have used U.S. made weapons and munitions in violation of international human rights and humanitarian law: Hellfire missiles, tear gas, Apache helicopters, White phosphorous — even militarized Caterpillar bulldozers. Our tax dollars are killing Palestinian children “of tender age” just as directly as we’re caging young immigrant children like animals.

Most recently, Amnesty International identified US-made Remington M24 rifles being used by Israeli forces against Palestinian civilians during protests along the fence with Gaza. Over 100 Palestinians were killed and thousands critically injured, including paramedics, reporters, and children.

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Changing this Administration’s policies at the border might be a short-term goal, but educating and motivating Americans to advocate, vote and demand that our government reflect our deepest held values for all children is the war that needs to be fought and won.

 

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All People Have Value

 

Kids and signsTrump’s policy of separating young children from their parents when they cross the border has galvanized Americans of all stripes to stand up and fight back.

Governors (Democrats and Republicans) are refusing to deploy their state’s National Guard to the border; television journalists are shedding tears on camera; mental health professionals are telling us about the long-term trauma these children will suffer; and members of Congress on both sides of the aisle are telling the Administration to end this outrageous policy while proclaiming that “America is better than this!”

Marchers gathering 3

Protests were organized in many U.S. cities this week. I joined 500+ people in El Paso to March about 1.5 – 2 miles to the detention facility where many immigrants are being processed through the system after their children are removed and taken somewhere else. We chanted, yelled and some swore while the national and international media captured our stories.

By every measure, this action was successful, and Border Network for Human Rights in El Paso must be recognized for its effective organizing efforts.  Within 24 hours, President Trump had signed an Executive Order ending the separation policy.

Was it the media attention, or the Governors’ actions, or Congress, or a combination of many actions that caused Trump to reverse course? We may never know. But I have no doubt that when Americans are aroused and angry, we can move mountains.

All People in All Countries Have Value

Then why aren’t Americans aroused and angry over our government’s funding and support for Israel’s systematic killing, maiming and traumatizing of Palestinian children in Gaza?

If “All People in All Countries have Value” — how do Americans not recognize and become incensed with our government’s complicity in Israel’s war crimes?

[This isn’t the blog post to explain or convince anyone about Israel’s war crimes, but I acknowledge that lack of education may be part of the answer to my question.]

If Rachel Maddow and other journalists started crying on camera when reporting about American-made (and American financed) bombs falling on Palestinian children in Gaza, would that move anyone?

If a few Governors proclaimed their distaste for U.S. priorities, such as allocating $3+ billion each year to Israel’s war machine while cutting social programs at home, would that move anyone?

If there were simultaneous demonstrations and marches in large U.S. cities protesting Israel’s willful and deliberate killing of Palestinian children, would that move anyone?

Probably not.

Most humans (not just Americans) have a finite wellspring of empathy which seems to be doled out sparingly, as though we’re fearful that the well might run dry.  Immigrant families crossing the southern border with their children? That we can get our hearts and minds around. Palestinian families half way around the world, not so much, even though our government is directly responsible for the suffering of both.

Love Thy Neighbor

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